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It’s an uncomfortable subject for many, but one that is getting more and more attention from the public. Animal testing and beauty products often go hand in hand. Many are now shedding light on the practice, looking to develop all beauty products without it. 

MIssed Part One of our story? Check it out and then read below some of the details regarding what animals go through:

Acute dermal toxicity – This uses 20 rabbits, guinea pigs or rats to determine how much substance causes half of the tested animals to die within two weeks of exposure. A chemical is applied to their shaved skin for 24 hours, and a patch is used to cover the area so they do not lick or clear off the tested area.

Eye irritation or corrosion – The process tests one to three rabbits; a chemical is applied to their eyes to determine how severe the resulting irritation or damage. The exposure tests for signs of redness, ulcers, bleeding, blindness and other forms of damage.

Developmental toxicity – This examines either 480 rabbits – 100 adult females and 480 kittens (babies) – or 1,300 rats – 100 adult females and 1,200 pups – to test for birth defects. Usually by force-feeding, a pregnant female is exposed at the beginning of an implemented pregnancy; exposure persists throughout the term.

The animal is then killed on the day before she is expected to give birth, which is about 22 days for rats, or 31 days for rabbits. Her young are extracted and evaluated for signs of developmental abnormalities.

Acute oral toxicity – Subjects seven rats to determine how much of a chemical causes half of the exposed animals to die within 14 days of exposure, when the substance is swallowed. The rats are force-fed the substance, causing them to experience convulsions, diarrhea, bleeding from the mouth, seizures, paralysis and sometimes death.

“The European Union has already banned cosmetics that use these practices, and I think Rep. Moran’s efforts are a sign of things to come here in the U.S.,” aninal rights activist Santosh Krinsky said.

“In fact, many consumers prefer lipstick, mascara, shampoo, lotion and other products consisting of material that’s so safe that they don’t require animal testing.”

How do you feel about testing beauty products on animals? Share your thoughts with a note below

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